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Tony Grist

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Wandering From One Thing To Another [Feb. 2nd, 2012|10:48 am]
Tony Grist
I dreamed I was going round a house/museum full of the most wonderfully beautiful dioramas. While I was in the dream I knew all sorts of things I don't know in my waking state- and which vanished as soon as my eyes opened. I think the dioramas had something to do with alternate universes or the astral planes, but of course I can't be sure. 

I know where the dioramas came from. They came from the episode of Midsummer Murders Ailz and I watched last night. One of the characters had a room full of miniature battlefields. There was also a headless horseman. A Headless Horseman! Who writes this stuff? I'll bet they have fun. 

I like what Neil Dudgeon has done with the Barnaby role. He's even less like a police detective than John Nettles was. I love this series . It's Scooby-do with posh people and country houses. The country house last night was a totally mad Victorian confection of turrets and gargoyles. The gargoyles came in handy for dropping from a great height on the squire's head. 

Because I was glued to Midsummer Murders I missed the third part of Johathan Meades' series on France. Meades is one of the few great originals who is still allowed to practise his craft on TV. I deplore him as much as I adore him, but what a lovely change it is to want to throw things at the screen not because it's so stupid but because it's so provocative. 

I'll catch Meades on i-player later today. I understand he's on about France and America and how the Gallic attitude could be summed up as "Yankee go home, but take me with you." Meades knows France from the inside- and aims to disabuse. As a common-or-garden lover of all things stereotypically French I have been finding this latest series particularly bracing. 
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: michaleen
2012-02-02 11:13 am (UTC)
"The dominant spirit, however, that haunts this enchanted region, and seems to be commander-in-chief of all the powers of the air, is the apparition of a figure on horseback, without a head." -- Washington Irving
Don't know about now, but back in the day every school child read this one, at some point. I enjoyed, Sleepy Hollow, Burton's film adaptation.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2012-02-02 11:24 am (UTC)
Headlessness is a common attribute of British ghosts. We have headless horsemen, headless dogs, headless queens...

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[User Picture]From: michaleen
2012-02-02 11:29 am (UTC)
Hadn't heard of a headless dog. I remember Anne Boleyn, though. I'm sure our ghosts were heavily influenced by English tradition.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2012-02-02 11:55 am (UTC)
You know the old music hall song about Boleyn- "With her Head Tucked Underneath her Arm"? Lovely stuff!
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[User Picture]From: sovay
2012-02-02 05:30 pm (UTC)
You know the old music hall song about Boleyn- "With her Head Tucked Underneath her Arm"?

I learned that from my grandmother! And then I grew up and found it was originally Stanley Holloway, which made me happy.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2012-02-02 07:16 pm (UTC)
Stanley Holloway was one of the greats.
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[User Picture]From: michaleen
2012-02-03 11:53 am (UTC)
Yes, indeed.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2012-02-02 07:11 pm (UTC)
Frustrating, innit!
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[User Picture]From: sovay
2012-02-02 05:26 pm (UTC)
There was also a headless horseman. A Headless Horseman! Who writes this stuff? I'll bet they have fun.

"If anyone spots the Queen of Scots in a hand-embroidered shroud / We're proud of the stately homes of England!"
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2012-02-02 07:16 pm (UTC)
We English love our ghosts.
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[User Picture]From: daisytells
2012-02-02 08:46 pm (UTC)
I love the French language, French food, French men - and women - and just about anything French. It disturbe me terribly when Americans went into hateland about France simply because she did not wish to join Bush's "coalition of the willing". I, too, was not willing to support the war in Iraq.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2012-02-03 09:50 am (UTC)
Yes, all that "cheese-eating surrender monkey" business was depressing. Especially since the French were in the right.
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[User Picture]From: michaleen
2012-02-03 11:57 am (UTC)
American conservatives tend to despise the French and have done since the French Revolution -- see the Alien and Sedition Acts, for instance.

Jefferson was a staunch Francophile and they hated him for it.
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