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Tony Grist

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Till Human Voices Wake Us [Feb. 13th, 2011|10:58 am]
Tony Grist
I've been finding recently that when I walk away from a work of fiction- a film or a book- its atmosphere briefly clings to me- so that I find myself having to remind myself that such and such an issue belongs to the characters I've left behind and not to me.  It's not unlike the adjustment one has to make on waking from a vivid dream.  I asked Ailz if she had ever had the same experience and she said, yes, all the time and for as long as she can remember. For me, though,  it's a novelty. 
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: steepholm
2011-02-13 11:05 am (UTC)
I'm with Ailz on this one - though it's not always 'brief'. Some of the damn things hang around for years!
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-13 11:10 am (UTC)
I've always kept fiction in a watertight compartment till now, but it seems to have sprung a leak...
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[User Picture]From: heleninwales
2011-02-13 03:14 pm (UTC)
Just wanted to second what you said. I've always had that hangover effect. It's not just books either, it can be films or TV programmes too.
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[User Picture]From: red_girl_42
2011-02-14 02:17 am (UTC)
Me too!
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[User Picture]From: shullie
2011-02-13 12:17 pm (UTC)
same here, and especially with dreams. if It's been a bad dream, or one of my occasional 'insecurity' dreams, I am not worth talking to for a while.. I still seem to carry the emotion with me!
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-13 12:43 pm (UTC)
I forget my dreams very quickly. My daytime mind has very strong protections around it. Too strong, I sometimes think...
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From: algabal
2011-02-13 06:43 pm (UTC)
"It's not unlike the adjustment one has to make on waking from a vivid dream."

Oh, I love that feeling, when you realize that horrendous problem existed only in your imagination, and your reality shifts.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-13 10:12 pm (UTC)
Yes, I've had dreams like that. It's great to come to and realise you're not- after all- a killer on the run...
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[User Picture]From: haikujaguar
2011-02-13 07:17 pm (UTC)
I sympathize. I once wrote a character who made me feel briefly gay. For men.

As a woman who likes men, I was very puzzled that this felt very different from usual.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-13 10:13 pm (UTC)
This has to be one of the uses of fiction, I think, that it stretches us beyond our usual boundaries.
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[User Picture]From: trixibelle_net
2011-02-13 10:02 pm (UTC)
Yes I absolutely always get that too. It's part of the reason I have to wait a day or a week before I start a new book, I have to wait until the residue of the previous one has been shaken off.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-13 10:16 pm (UTC)
I agree about leaving a gap between books. I like to have time to reflect upon a book before I launch into the next one. I remember, as a child, finding it very difficult to move on from a book I had loved
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[User Picture]From: red_girl_42
2011-02-14 02:20 am (UTC)
I just had to comment that the title of this post used to be the title of my LJ. The subtitle, of course, was, "and we drown."

In addition to what you're describing, I also tend to feel a sense of grief when I finish a book that I really enjoyed. It's done, and there is no more of it to read, and I will miss the characters, and I feel sad.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-14 09:46 am (UTC)
I can identify with that.

There are characters from fiction that become one's lifelong friends.
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From: (Anonymous)
2011-02-14 02:29 pm (UTC)
I identify with these feelings - most recently felt when I finished Wives and Daughters by Mrs Gsskell. I felt really sad to leave behind Molly and her sensible father!
jenny x
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-14 10:09 pm (UTC)
The only thing I've read of Gaskell's is Cranford- and that was decades ago.

She was a Manchester writer BTW- but you probably already knew that :)


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