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Tony Grist

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The Egyptian Revolution [Feb. 11th, 2011|06:37 pm]
Tony Grist
Mubarak did everything he could to stay in power. He played nasty, he played nice, he sent in the heavies, he made concessions, he negotiated. The people in Tahrir Square took it all, never changed their demands and everything he threw at them broke on their resolve.  Last night he appeared in the character of father of his country, waxed sentimental over himself and said he was staying. Today he went.

Governments everywhere- of every stripe- have been reminded they exist only by permission of the people.
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: steepholm
2011-02-11 07:07 pm (UTC)
Amen.
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[User Picture]From: ron_broxted
2011-02-11 07:56 pm (UTC)
Spookily last night I said to my family that Mubarak had made Obama look an idiot. Lo, and behold by tea time he was packing his bags. Will my other prediction come to fruition? Egypt fever is exported to England.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-11 08:02 pm (UTC)
I think a lot of countries are going to feel the fever.
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[User Picture]From: brttvns
2011-02-11 08:09 pm (UTC)
Well said. My sentiments exactly. I hope us here in Britain take note of that.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-11 08:45 pm (UTC)
I notice "people power" is already beginning to force the Coalition to rethink some of its policies- selling off the forests for starters.
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[User Picture]From: brttvns
2011-02-11 08:56 pm (UTC)
I certainly hope so. Selling off the forests is one of the most vulgar ideas I've heard.
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[User Picture]From: veronica_milvus
2011-02-11 11:42 pm (UTC)
Well should a government controlled monopoly (the forestry comission) with no accountability to anyone, be in charge of our natural resources?
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-12 09:37 am (UTC)
Better that, I think, than a rabble of equally unaccountable private owners. I get the impression the Forestry Commission does quite a good job of enabling access and so on.
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[User Picture]From: veronica_milvus
2011-02-11 11:41 pm (UTC)
I really don't think we have anything to complain about or worth having a revolution for; we at least have a vote. Our problem is not having anyone decent to vote for.

To equate us with Egypt is to totally misunderstand what it is like to live under a totalitarian dictatorship.
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[User Picture]From: wolfshift
2011-02-12 01:44 am (UTC)
Agreed. I think the issues in Egypt are of a different order altogether from those in Britain or North America. poliphilo's original point stands (that governments exist by permission of the people), but I don't think the ferocity of the Egyptian protests translates to our situations.
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[User Picture]From: brttvns
2011-02-12 08:27 am (UTC)
But what has happened in Egypt does remind us that we are capable of ousting a government if that government continues to break its promises. I never mentioned reveloution or totalitarian dictatorship, but the comparisons are only a question of scale.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-12 09:41 am (UTC)
I don't predict a full scale revolution for any of the western democracies, but I believe we've just had an object lesson in what can be achieved when protesters stick to their guns.
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[User Picture]From: jenny_evergreen
2011-02-11 08:57 pm (UTC)
*emphatic nod*
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[User Picture]From: shewhomust
2011-02-11 09:03 pm (UTC)

Governments everywhere- of every stripe- have been reminded they exist only by permission of the people.


I wish. But while that's partly true, there's also the question of what the army will do...
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2011-02-12 09:48 am (UTC)
The Egyptian army seems to be a popular institution- not only in the sense of being well-liked, but also in the sense of being of the people. Most national armies have this character I think. If Britain had a revolution (which is most unlikely)I doubt whether the politicians could trust the soldiers to fire on the people.
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