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Tony Grist

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Warkworth Castle: Interior [Nov. 1st, 2008|04:56 pm]
Tony Grist
As requested by pondhopper 





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Comments:
[User Picture]From: karenkay
2008-11-01 05:39 pm (UTC)
What's the bottom photo?
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2008-11-01 05:46 pm (UTC)
Those are kitchen fire-places- big enough to roast a whole ox.
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[User Picture]From: pondhopper
2008-11-01 06:36 pm (UTC)
That was going to be my next question.
:)
I love that first picture. What fantastic stone work and the arches and windows are special. Who takes care of the property?

Thanks for posting these, Tony. Looks like my kind of place.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2008-11-01 08:44 pm (UTC)
It's in the care of English Heritage.

We met the on-the-spot custodians- a very friendly couple.
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[User Picture]From: karenkay
2008-11-01 06:36 pm (UTC)
Or two.:) I liked the exterior photos, but I think I like the interior even better.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2008-11-01 08:44 pm (UTC)
They knew how to throw a dinner party in the 15th century.
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[User Picture]From: karenkay
2008-11-01 09:00 pm (UTC)
I really enjoy your photos--I find them deeply satisfying in a strange (for me) way--I haven't been an Anglophile since I got over my Beatles phase in high school.

But there's no way I would have wanted to actually live in the 15th century, fabulous dinner parties or no.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2008-11-01 09:41 pm (UTC)
The 15th is one of my favourite centuries. I don't altogether know why. Maybe it's got something to do with Shakespeare's history plays.

I'm glad you like the photos.
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[User Picture]From: karenkay
2008-11-01 09:53 pm (UTC)
I'd like to visit the 15th century in a bubble, and go home at the end of the day.

There's something real about the 15th century English art and architecture you photograph. Unfiltered. Authentic. Not dressed up.(A lot of French architecture is overdressed.)
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2008-11-01 10:46 pm (UTC)
I'd want to take my toothbrush and various other modern amenities if I were visiting.

That's an interesting point you make. English castles of the period are certainly more "homely" than the average French chateau- maybe because we were further from the epicentre of the Renaissance. Scottish architecture is heavily indebted to the French- see my pictures of Falkland palace- but somehow manages to take the French forms and make them into something craggy and northern. Falkland Palace is a fairly tame example of Scottish renaissance architecture- probably because it's the earliest- but later examples of the style can be truly monstrous.
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[User Picture]From: karenkay
2008-11-02 12:43 am (UTC)
I'll have to look at your Falkland photos again--I don't remember any French influence.

"Scottish renaissance" sounds like an oxymoron to me, but I am clearly pig-ignorant of that part of the world.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2008-11-02 10:58 am (UTC)
The Scots and the French were allies (against the damn English of course) and the Stuart kings were very much at home in the French court. Mary Queen of Scots grew up at the French court and was more French than Scots. Falkland Palace is touted as the earliest Renaissance building in Scotland (perhaps in the whole of Britain) and French masons were imported to build it.
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[User Picture]From: oakmouse
2008-11-01 08:09 pm (UTC)
I haven't been commenting much, but I've been tremendously enjoying the photos. As always, you have an amazing eye. Thanks for posting them!
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2008-11-01 08:45 pm (UTC)
I'm so glad you like them.
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[User Picture]From: silverhawkdruid
2008-11-01 10:44 pm (UTC)
Ditto! You take lovely shots.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2008-11-01 10:46 pm (UTC)
Thank you.
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[User Picture]From: ajoyfulgirl
2008-11-02 10:09 pm (UTC)

Wow.

I always enjoy your photos-- never yet having left the U.S. (and living predominantly on the West Coast), I appreciate borrowing your eyes when you go adventuring. I've met trees older almost than history itself, but I've seen very little dating earlier than the late 1800s as far as architecture goes. Images like these-- I don't know that I can wrap my head around all that history. The top picture you've posted here in particular is a punch to the gut, and I don't quite know why. Maybe because it looks less ruined, less part of a picturesque landscape, and more like someone ought to be walking down those steps on their way to dinner.

Thank you for sharing.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2008-11-03 10:04 am (UTC)

Re: Wow.

Warkworth Castle is only slightly ruined- all the walls are sound- and it wouldn't take much to make it habitable again. Of course many houses of that period are lived in. Falkland Palace, which I featured a few posts back, was restored and refurbished in the 19th century- and very cosy it is too.
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[User Picture]From: jackiejj
2008-11-04 04:48 pm (UTC)
LOVE the angles. And the light.

There's something wonderfully creepy about those low arches; one can imagine how cold in winter--what are they? (The bottom photograph)
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2008-11-04 05:39 pm (UTC)
Thanks.

Those are kitchen fireplaces. They're big enough to roast a whole ox or pig.

In another castle I visited there's a haunted kitchen- where a ghostly woman has been observed placing a baby in a fireplace very much like these.
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[User Picture]From: jackiejj
2008-11-04 05:54 pm (UTC)
Hmmm: I seem to remember that some fireplaces actually had seating at their edges.

If one agrees with Jung's theory, that great emotional conflict leads to "markers" in terms of the archetypes, then maybe that's what happens with ghosts, too--when there's a moment of emotional upheaval, it's marked by energy-in-the-air, visible.
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