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Tony Grist

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Leasehold Title [Jul. 10th, 2007|08:46 am]
Tony Grist
Our solicitor has sent us a lot of old papers relating to our house.  Among them is the original leasehold title. It's dated 1909 (a year earlier than I'd been told)  but looks like it could be medieval-  a big, folded parchment with wax seals, covered in scratchy writing with fancy capitals. I wouldn't say it was a beautiful object, but the penmanship is something to wonder at. 

This is what they kept clerks for, isn't it- Bob Cratchit, Dick Swiveller, Uriah Heep? That's what they did all day on their high stools at their high desks- they turned out documents like this. 

How awful.

I'm told the information is stored electronically these days and the original papers have nothing but curiosity value.

I have tried reading them but my mind wandered. 

The first lesee of the house was Mrs Annie Blunn, wife of John Blunn, contractor

who sold it in 1925  to Samuel Buckley, cotton doubler

who sold it in 1943 to Thomas Sargent, aircraft inspector.

Then there's a gap (I may have the missing information somewhere but I'd have to turn the house upside down to find it)

Until 1986- when I came into the picture and became possessed of "all that plot of land situate in Belgrave Road Oldham aforesaid containing in the whole one hundred and eighty eight and one ninth superficial square yards or thereabouts...AND ALSO ALL THAT messuage or dwellinghouse and premises numbered *** Belgrave Road Oldham aforesaid erected upon the said plot of land or upon some part thereof TOGETHER with the appurtenances."




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Comments:
[User Picture]From: momof2girls
2007-07-10 12:07 pm (UTC)
Fun! Isn't it interesting to find historic documents like this?
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2007-07-10 12:23 pm (UTC)
Yes. I only wish I knew more.
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[User Picture]From: jubal51394
2007-07-10 01:29 pm (UTC)

You will...

be framing this piece of loveliness, right?
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2007-07-10 02:00 pm (UTC)

Re: You will...

Erm, no...I don't think so.

But we'll be keeping it safe.
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[User Picture]From: kishenehn
2007-07-10 03:29 pm (UTC)
Wow, that thing is adorable! No digital file will ever compare.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2007-07-10 03:59 pm (UTC)
That's true.

But it must have been gruesome having to produce these documents day after day.
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[User Picture]From: sovay
2007-07-10 05:59 pm (UTC)
It's dated 1909 (a year earlier than I'd been told) but looks like it could be medieval- a big, folded parchment with wax seals, covered in scratchy writing with fancy capitals. I wouldn't say it was a beautiful object, but the penmanship is something to wonder at.

I am glad I was not the person required to produce it, but as a piece of legal history, that's fantastic.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2007-07-11 08:09 am (UTC)
What I like best is knowing the names of the people who lived here before us.
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[User Picture]From: mummm
2007-07-10 07:52 pm (UTC)
The handwriting is wonderful. The calligraphy is even better. It's great... should be framed in my humble opinion.

I know you think it would be tedious and gruesome writing out those documents all day long but you do need to remember that there are people who do actually enjoy that kind of work. I know a lot of calligraphers who love *tedious*. The medieval monks were amazing ARTISTS and I truly don't think they minded doing the work!

My Great-Great-Great Grandfather had beautiful handwriting. Even in his normal ledgers (for his medical practice) are pieces of art.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2007-07-11 01:10 pm (UTC)
Clerking was the lowest rung of the ladder for those with middle-class aspirations. The work was boring, repetitive and poorly paid. It's a commonplace of 19th century literature that the clerks had it hard.

But I'm sure, as you suggest, that many of them took pride in their skills.
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[User Picture]From: mummm
2007-07-11 02:05 pm (UTC)
Yes sir
I see your point.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2007-07-11 02:13 pm (UTC)
Sorry, that came across as a little school-masterly, didn't it?
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[User Picture]From: mummm
2007-07-11 02:25 pm (UTC)
Mine comments did too. My apologies!

I love doing calligraphy but not for hours on end. I would not make a good clerk.
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[User Picture]From: mummm
2007-07-11 02:26 pm (UTC)
*My* comments... sheesh! Twangle-fingers...
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[User Picture]From: sina_says
2007-07-11 02:23 pm (UTC)
oooh.

i handle deeds regularly, as i'm a real estate appraiser. none of them are this pretty.

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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2007-07-11 02:53 pm (UTC)
We've got a succesion of documents relating to the house. The nearer they come to the present day the less impressive they are
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