?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Trek - Eroticdreambattle — LiveJournal [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Tony Grist

[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

Trek [Aug. 3rd, 2005|11:41 am]
Tony Grist
Star Trek just ended with the last ever episode of Enterprise. You'd think it would have been a major media event and it wasn't. All of us true Trekkers stopped caring a long time ago. Maybe the franchise will be revived and maybe it won't.

There was a shoot out with a bunch of ugly aliens, some character I was supposed to care about but didn't blew himself up in an act of heroic self sacrifice (like a suicide bomber) and Archer got to hug the sexy Vulcan. There was a bang, there was a whimper and now Berman and Bragga are going away to have a long, long think.

Enterprise has been crap. In fact all of Trek has been crap since the point, about three quarters of the way though DS9, when they switched from cool storylines about post-colonialism and theocracy to uncool story lines about explosions.

I had been hoping this last episode might pull out a few stops and contain glances backwards (forwards?) to the glory days. And it did. It shoehorned Riker and Troi into the action. I winced when Riker was made to say he was a big fan of Captain Archer's but- never mind- it was good to see them.

How well they're both looking!
linkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: jackiejj
2005-08-03 05:25 am (UTC)
Please tell: what was the storyline about Riker and Troi? Were they still married? What were they up to?

I miss them. (But I do have their every episode on DVD.)

The end of Enterprise. Thud.
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-08-03 05:53 am (UTC)
Erm, they seemed to be back on board the Enterprise under Picard (but mysteriously looking 15 years older) and they were viewing the story about Archer on the holodeck. It all seemed to relate somehow to Riker's trauma about the Pegasus.

To tell the truth it didn't make a whole lot of sense.

It was just nice to see them again.

Oh- and we heard Data speaking over the inter-com.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: jackiejj
2005-08-03 06:00 am (UTC)
Good old Data.

They just had to go kill him off.

(Reply) (Parent) (Thread) (Expand)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-08-03 06:07 am (UTC)
They killed him off?

I didn't know that. Did it happen in one of the movies?

How do you kill an android? Can't you just replicate the circuitry and programming and bring him back to life?

(Reply) (Parent) (Thread) (Expand)
(no subject) - (Anonymous) Expand
[User Picture]From: halfmoon_mollie
2005-08-03 09:26 am (UTC)
Hey, Riker and Troi never married. She married Worf - and then died of some strange disease, and Riker wouldn't speak to Troi after that.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
From: (Anonymous)
2005-08-03 10:01 am (UTC)
But, hold!

You're thinking of the final episode, during which Picard went back and forth through time and was given glimpses of possible futures.

In the final movie, Troi and Riker were married by Picard.

If you'll recall, in the final TV show, Picard said the timelines were only possibilities, and had probably been altered by their intervention.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-08-03 11:01 am (UTC)
Aren't you thinking of Dax?
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread) (Expand)
[User Picture]From: butterscotch711
2005-08-03 05:40 am (UTC)
Maybe the Star Trek franchise will now be like Doctor Who was, and there will be audio dramas on CD and books which are more creative (and more intensely read) than the novelisations and by-the-dozen tie-in novellas that have come before.

I think Star Trek suffers for being the most fan-intensive franchise ever. Obsessive attention to confusing continuity is part of what killed Doctor Who the last time, and it has been weighing down Star Trek for ages. There needs to be more creativity, more freedom, more ideas and less lurching around the bridge and diverting power between different parts of the ship.

I think Roger Ebert said in his review of the last Star Trek movie that the whole franchise should just jump another 1,000 years into the future or something. It certainly needs to get out of its rut.
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-08-03 06:05 am (UTC)
I think a large part of the problem has been the quality of the writing. We've just not been getting good stories or engaging characters.

I'm a big fan of DS9. It took the franchise into new waters and introduced a whole collection of fascinating characters (played by a company of very strong actors.) Sadly the producers lost their nerve towards the end of the run and dumbed it down.

Voyager was patchy.

I hope there will be a new show eventually. And I hope it will reinvent the franchise. The new Dr Who demonstrates how this is possible.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: butterscotch711
2005-08-03 06:36 am (UTC)
I agree about DS9. I never saw any of it until last year when I had a housemate with pay-TV, so I so bits and pieces of it - and all of what I saw was pretty amazing.

And I agree about Voyager. Voyager annoyed me because it was faced with two possibilities and didn't have the nerve to follow either through. It could have used its setting on the other side of the galaxy to leave the old Star Trek world behind and really tackle new, big ideas, and that would have been great. Or it could have just been flat-out Horatio Hornblower in space, and that could have been very fun. But it ummed and aahed and gazed at its toes and hedged its bets for seven seasons.

I hope Star Trek comes back too. I hope it comes back with more verve, and more political sass, and more willingness to deal with its (unavoidable) political allegories.

I also think that if Berman and Braga go have a long, long think the Star Trek universe (if not the commercial franchise) will change into something completely different while they're gone. I think in a way the Star Trek fandom is more important in its legacy than the TV show itself.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-08-03 07:42 am (UTC)
Voyager was compromised from the start. It was an attempt to return to an old, tried formula after the experiment of DS9. I read an interview with the guy who played Chakotay in which he said the scripts were rubbish and he could barely say his lines without giggling and basically he was only in it for the money. He implied that most of the cast and crew felt the same. I doubt if the atmosphere was like that on the set of TNG. Somewhere along the way there had been a massive loss of heart.

I think you're right about the legacy. The Star Trek ethos- embodied in characters like Kirk and Spock and Picard- transcends the TV shows.

(Reply) (Parent) (Thread) (Expand)
[User Picture]From: ibid
2005-08-03 09:32 am (UTC)
Yeah DS9 was easily the best to my mind. Voyage began well until Brannon Braga fell for Seven of Nine (who wasn't very interesting anyway).
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-08-03 11:17 am (UTC)
Seven of Nine was fun to begin with, but then she became predictable.

My favourite Voyager episodes were the ones where Janeway palled around with Leonardo da Vinci. I found the master-pupil relationship (with the pupil knowing so much more than the master) rather touching.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread) (Expand)
[User Picture]From: ibid
2005-08-03 09:34 am (UTC)
I think they need at least a five year gap though to get over the fatigue.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-08-03 11:18 am (UTC)
Five years is good by me.

Just so long as the show they finally come up with has a bit of zip.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)