?

Log in

No account? Create an account
St Peter, Ashburnham - Eroticdreambattle [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Tony Grist

[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

St Peter, Ashburnham [May. 5th, 2016|08:36 pm]
Tony Grist


It doesn't look it, but this (apart from the tower which is 200 years earlier) is a 17th century church- built by the Ashburnham family in 1665 to honour the old ways and house their dead. Here is one of their tombs- a little clunky if you look at the details- but in general terms rather splendidly and unEnglishly baroque- by a sculptor- J Bushell- who had trained in Italy.



The big house, Ashburnham Place, was largely demolished in the 1950s- a victim of dry rot and death duties- but the parkland- landscaped by Capability Brown- has been maintained. The remaining buildings now house a Christian conference centre and retreat house.

Here's the view from the churchyard.

linkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: pondhopper
2016-05-05 10:39 pm (UTC)
I see what you mean by clunky though it is splendid in its own odd way. The view from the churchyard is also splendid. Are those rapeseed fields?
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2016-05-06 09:17 am (UTC)
Yes, that'll be rapeseed. No other crop is so vividly yellow.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: puddleshark
2016-05-06 10:26 am (UTC)
...who had trained in Italy...

Though not quite for long enough, by the look of it. It is a wonderful memorial though, in its own way - I love the putto with buoyancy problems.
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2016-05-06 03:08 pm (UTC)
The man's grief is palpable and striking. Bushnell may have had problems with cherubs, but he got that right.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
From: cmcmck
2016-05-06 10:33 am (UTC)
St Margaret's Rochester has the same odd combo of mediaeval tower and much later chancel (18th century). Due to a fire in that case.
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2016-05-06 03:11 pm (UTC)
I've come across a lot of churches where the tower is earlier- and sometimes later- than the body of the church.

The church at Wye- which I visited recently is medieval but with an 18th century chancel. St Mary of Charity in Faversham is medieval, but with a neo-classical nave...
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
From: cmcmck
2016-05-06 03:53 pm (UTC)
It's certainly not uncommon.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)