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Tony Grist

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All Saints, Woodchurch [Apr. 29th, 2016|04:22 pm]
Tony Grist




These glass panels look 17th century to me- and almost certainly not English. The allegorical figure on the left represents Faith or The Church. The panel on the left shows Joseph being grabbed at by Potiphar's wife.



Fragments of medieval glass. The roundel represents the interment of The Virgin 
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Comments:
From: cmcmck
2016-04-29 03:26 pm (UTC)
I think you're right. They look German to me.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2016-04-29 05:49 pm (UTC)
German, Dutch, Flemish- Northern European anyway...
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From: cmcmck
2016-05-02 02:21 pm (UTC)
Certainly!
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[User Picture]From: pondhopper
2016-04-29 09:18 pm (UTC)
I prefer the medieval glass to the other, wherever it's from. There is so little of it (the Medieval stuff) left. The other glass looks like book illustrations.

Edited at 2016-04-29 09:18 pm (UTC)
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2016-04-30 08:39 am (UTC)
I love anything medieval. The colours of this particular roundel are gorgeous.

The 17th century glass paintings might well have been copied from contemporary prints.
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[User Picture]From: pondhopper
2016-04-30 02:07 pm (UTC)
Medieval and Romanesque...my favourite historical period for art and architecture. Gothic is grand also (in many ways) but if there are two churches side by side, one Romanesque and one Gothic, you know where to look for me first.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2016-04-30 04:20 pm (UTC)
I'm the same. I don't altogether understand my devotion to the round-headed arch- but it's non-negotiable.
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[User Picture]From: clindau
2016-04-30 04:43 am (UTC)
A pleasant little church, even if I didn't find any long-lost ancestors in the graveyard.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2016-04-30 08:40 am (UTC)
No ancestors? That's a shame.
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[User Picture]From: clindau
2016-04-30 11:51 am (UTC)
Yes, I was hopeful, but not surprised. Henry left for the New World in 1639, so any gravestones for his parents or siblings would have crumbled away years ago. I like to think that they are there incognito.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2016-04-30 04:28 pm (UTC)
I poke around a great deal in churchyards and I don't think I've ever found a gravestone earlier than the second half of the 17th century. Before 1660 (approx) if you could afford an inscribed gravestone or monument you got yourself buried inside the church. Only the poorer sort would have been buried outside and their grave markers (if any) would have been made of wood.
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[User Picture]From: puddleshark
2016-04-30 05:39 am (UTC)
Blimey! - the buttress is almost as big as the tower. One senses there may have been problems...

Lovely continental glass.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2016-04-30 08:45 am (UTC)
I'm thinking the buttress may be older than the tower. It seems greatly out of proportion.

These Kentish churches used to be on the front line of the endless medieval wars with France- and many of them were clearly built with defence in mind. Some of them have massive towers. My guess is that the tower here was once much bigger and has been rebuilt on a smaller scale- but with the buttress left in place.
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