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Tony Grist

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The Power of Art [Jan. 28th, 2015|08:04 am]
Tony Grist
Ivy- now aged two and a half- was waltzing round the floor to the sound of a little, shiny, hand-held, musical box that plays "Let it Go".

Her mother- that's Alice, my daughter- says little girls in their droves are abandoning pink and adopting blue as their favourite colour- and it's all down to Frozen.

Such is the power of art.
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: heleninwales
2015-01-28 11:58 am (UTC)
I do hope they're abandoning pink! I hate the way the girls' toys have all been pinkwashed. A bit of variety is very welcome.
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2015-01-28 12:31 pm (UTC)
I'm very fond of pink as a colour- but I hate how it's become gendered.
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[User Picture]From: lblanchard
2015-01-28 01:13 pm (UTC)
Totally off topic -- heleninwales, do I spy a crochet pattern that could be adapted to a Yorkist rose in your userpic?
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[User Picture]From: heleninwales
2015-01-28 05:23 pm (UTC)
I never noticed the similarity before, but now you point it out, if done in the right colours, it absolutely could be modified only slightly to make a Yorkist rose.

If you want the pattern, just google "African flower" and you'll find it.
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[User Picture]From: lblanchard
2015-01-29 12:05 am (UTC)
Thanks. I think I could reverse-engineer it from this thumbnail.
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From: cmcmck
2015-01-28 01:26 pm (UTC)
It's amusing that things appear have come full circle.

Pink was considered far too strong a colour for little girls by the Victorians- very much a colour for boys. They dressed their daughters in blue. It's no accident that Alice's dress is blue..........
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2015-01-28 05:43 pm (UTC)
As in "My sweet little Alice-blue gown".

One thing I don't think I've ever come across is an explanation of why pink became a girl's colour.
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From: cmcmck
2015-01-28 05:51 pm (UTC)
The very one! :o)

It's intrigued me enough to do some fashion history research, which is most unlike me, but I haven't been able to find an exact point at which it tips.

Still pink as a 'male' colour into the twenties and at some point it tips until by the late forties it's a 'female' colour which makes me wonder if the war had something to do with it.
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[User Picture]From: wyrmwwd
2015-01-28 03:59 pm (UTC)
I do not understand why "Frozen" was such a hit with the kids, but clearly it was. When I was teaching Kid's Corner, every so often, the kids would suddenly, spontaneously, break into song... "Let It Go"!

It was very cute... the first 20 times or so....
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2015-01-28 05:44 pm (UTC)
I haven't seen it. My daughter says I should and that it reduced her to tears.
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[User Picture]From: sorenr
2015-01-28 04:04 pm (UTC)
I've seen Frozen and was, to be quite honest, rather underwhelmed. It's decent enough, and I guess as far as Disney Princesses go this one is quite empowering. (And that blasted song is catchy as anything...)

And yes! Get girls into some blues and yellows and greens - and also pink if they like that, but don't shove it down their throats!
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[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2015-01-28 05:50 pm (UTC)
I normally avoid Disney movies but I think I'll make an exception of this one. There's clearly something going on of considerable cultural significance.

I like pink. I want to see it become gender neutral again. Or- more precisely- I want to see all colours become gender neutral.
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[User Picture]From: resonant
2015-01-29 12:07 am (UTC)
It's astoundingly progressive for a mass-market children's movie intended to sell toys and accessories. Strong female characters persevere against bigotry, and control their own destinies.
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