?

Log in

No account? Create an account
My Fair Lady - Eroticdreambattle — LiveJournal [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Tony Grist

[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

My Fair Lady [Mar. 11th, 2005|09:21 am]
Tony Grist
I wish I liked Rogers and Hammerstein more. Oscar Hammerstein was obviously such a nice man. But it's the music- it's so smooth and sweet. Listening to one of their scores is like bathing in milk chocolate.

So if I can't take R&H, how am I to explain my love of My Fair Lady? Maybe it's just an Audrey Hepburn thing.

Audrey Hepburn + Rex Harrison + Stanley Holloway + Cecil Beaton + George Bernard Shaw. OK, the songs are chocolately, but it's bitter chocolate. One thing you don't get in Hammerstein's work is wit.
linkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: halfmoon_mollie
2005-03-11 03:27 am (UTC)
The movie is okay. I don't care for Audrey Hepburn...since she didn't do her own singing, I don't know why they couldn't have substituted Julie Andrews' voice - she was, after all the BROADWAY Eliza.

I guess a lot of the reason Oscar Hammerstein's music was so popular was exactly the reason you say - considering the time in history that it really was at its most popular. Escapism, maybe?
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-03-11 03:50 am (UTC)
The R & H shows aren't really escapist. Carousel deals with wife abuse, South Pacific takes a brave, liberal line on inter-racial relationships . Hammerstein had a real social conscience. What he lacked, I think, is any kind of edge, any sense of ambiguity. He's so brightly optimistic about human nature.

And the music is so smooth....

As for Audrey- I just think she was the most beautiful woman who ever lived.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: halfmoon_mollie
2005-03-11 11:03 am (UTC)
As for Audrey- I just think she was the most beautiful woman who ever lived.

She was in Robin and Marian, right? I liked her in that movie, thought she aged well.

(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-03-11 11:35 am (UTC)
Ah yes, that's a favourite of mine. And I don't think Sean Connery has ever been better.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: halfmoon_mollie
2005-03-11 12:45 pm (UTC)
Sean Connery.

(sigh)

(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: airstrip
2005-03-11 04:59 pm (UTC)
That's really part of what I like about R&H is that sort of sunny optimism juxtaposed with fairly deep and sometimes violent social issues. I think it's an interesting dichotomy to say the least, like singing a song about suicide as if it were bubble gum pop.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-03-11 11:32 pm (UTC)
I see what you mean.

And I am trying to like them....
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
From: ad_lumen
2005-03-11 05:40 am (UTC)
I've always thought Rogers was much better when paired with Hart. There is a satirical edge to those scores that seems to have been smoothed away in the Hammerstein shows.
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-03-11 06:08 am (UTC)
I guess that's the difference between Hart and Hammerstein, the one a wry (and tortured) cynic, the other a big old softy.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
(Deleted comment)
[User Picture]From: poliphilo
2005-03-11 11:30 pm (UTC)
The present trend is for cobbling musicals together from pop songs. There's been an Abba musical and a Rod Stewart musical and a Queen musical and I understand a Lennon musoical is in the offing. It doesn't bode well for the genre.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)